Time, Gestures and Fictions

No one disputes the fact that we are caught up in an unsustainable model of development. We are only beginning to understand the importance of changing direction and looking for other forms of living. The question, then, is how to come up with flexible strategies for inhabiting the world. Since Robinson Crusoe’s shipwreck, we are aware of the need for living in common, of living together. Paraphrasing Judith Butler, we always need a community, the support and help it gives us, in order to bring about change. Perhaps, in the act of thinking as a society, we ought to re-examine our relationships of interdependence in the knowledge that, if there is reciprocity, they can lead to free relationships.

This exhibition takes its starting point in the opportunity we had to work and spend time inside a convent of cloistered nuns. In the hope of finding other organizational forms of emancipation and liberation, we have undertaken an exercise in cohabitation and observation which has enabled us to explore the everyday practices that take place behind the walls of the convent. Underlying this space of autonomy and self-sufficiency which is also, at the same time, a place of confinement and segregation, is a reality of collectiveness and belonging that, almost without us realising it, attracted our gaze towards an analysis of their “ways of doing”, of their routines and rituals.

What happens when we are inside is that the perception of time and space is deformed. Sounds which you would have imagined to be imperceptible are amplified and, in the corridors, one can hear the echoes of footsteps coming and going. We began to see the evidence of a life decision, of isolating and confining oneself within a given framework, as a possible way of being. As we explored the various spaces and rooms, we began to realise the special importance of work spaces within the convent. The handcrafted tasks undertaken inside the convent over the course of many centuries reveal a language of miscegenation and gestures that endure through customs and habits. As a whole, we discovered the way in which to begin a dialogue with the processes of some contemporary artists whose practices examine time, crafts and community.

The idea is to propose approaches and reflections that explore other ways of being in the world and of collectively articulating space, in search of a horizontal dialogue in different times and with multiple fictions.

 

Pérez & Requena, curators

No one disputes the fact that we are caught up in an unsustainable model of development. We are only beginning to understand the importance of changing direction and looking for other forms of living. The question, then, is how to come up with flexible strategies for inhabiting the world. Since Robinson Crusoe’s shipwreck, we are aware of the need for living in common, of living together. Paraphrasing Judith Butler, we always need a community, the support and help it gives us, in order to bring about change. Perhaps, in the act of thinking as a society, we ought to re-examine our relationships of interdependence in the knowledge that, if there is reciprocity, they can lead to free relationships.

This exhibition takes its starting point in the opportunity we had to work and spend time inside a convent of cloistered nuns. In the hope of finding other organizational forms of emancipation and liberation, we have undertaken an exercise in cohabitation and observation which has enabled us to explore the everyday practices that take place behind the walls of the convent. Underlying this space of autonomy and self-sufficiency which is also, at the same time, a place of confinement and segregation, is a reality of collectiveness and belonging that, almost without us realising it, attracted our gaze towards an analysis of their “ways of doing”, of their routines and rituals.

What happens when we are inside is that the perception of time and space is deformed. Sounds which you would have imagined to be imperceptible are amplified and, in the corridors, one can hear the echoes of footsteps coming and going. We began to see the evidence of a life decision, of isolating and confining oneself within a given framework, as a possible way of being. As we explored the various spaces and rooms, we began to realise the special importance of work spaces within the convent. The handcrafted tasks undertaken inside the convent over the course of many centuries reveal a language of miscegenation and gestures that endure through customs and habits. As a whole, we discovered the way in which to begin a dialogue with the processes of some contemporary artists whose practices examine time, crafts and community.

The idea is to propose approaches and reflections that explore other ways of being in the world and of collectively articulating space, in search of a horizontal dialogue in different times and with multiple fictions.

 

Pérez & Requena, curators